LES SAISONS DU TRINKHALL

We have decided to extend the “Faces/Borders” exhibition until next February, so that anyone who has been unable to visit due to sanitary restrictions has the opportunity to see it. Furthermore, we will be holding four new exhibitions from 24 September: Pascal Tassini and Pierre De Peet at the Trinkhall; Yvon Vandycke at the Boverie; five Walloon region Créahm artists at “la Biennale Hors Normes” in Lyon.

Alain Meert et Patrick Marczewski, Le musée idéal, technique mixte, 290 x 185 x 80 cm , 2019. Atelier : Créahm Liège (BE) ©M.Thies/collection trinkhallmuseum

THE IDEAL MUSEUM

The Ideal Museum is a piece created throughout 2019 by one of the leading artists of the Créahm workshops, Alain Meert, in preparation for the opening of the Trinkhall. The artist answered our question - What is a museum? - with a galleon in full sail, which casually displays drawings, paintings and sculptures. It is a scene of paper, cardboard, objects, multiple unusual and familiar presences, lodged precisely between states of consciousness. The whole world that fits into a boat: Alain Meert's ark. And it is a museum, just as we want it to be, dreamily navigating among ideas, shapes and emotions. Ship Lieutenant Alain Meert is a pirate. So, let’s all climb aboard with a heave ho!

Trinkhall Newsletter

Carried away by the crowd, surrounded by the fairground…

Carried away by the crowd, surrounded by the fairground…

We are surrounded by the fair which, like almost every year since 1873, has erected its machines and stalls in the Parc d’Avroy. Will we also enter into the fairground atmosphere, spending several weeks immersed in the noisy chaos of the attractions, the lights, the dreams and the smoke? In any case, the museum is in its place and welcomes the legacy of a wealth of stories and emotions which secretly make sense – the place where we find ourselves, our safeguard, where we spread our wings… 

A strange building, the first Trinkhall was built here in 1881, under the orders of a now-forgotten architect: Alexandre Renier, who had studied in Paris and taught for some time at the Liège Fine Arts Academy. This is where he acquired an uncompromising taste for oriental style. In the middle of the Parc d’Avroy, he designed an Arabian Nights-style palace, encased in steel with an oriental design and two prevailing copper towers with Moorish influences.

The furnishings – the tables, chairs, majolica crockery, chandeliers directly copied from a Cairo café and all the ornaments - are in keeping with the architecture. The building was inaugurated on 21 July 1881, during the celebrations of Belgium’s fiftieth anniversary, when the whole town was bedecked with lights and enjoying processions and parties. At the Trinkhall, where people were squeezed into the crowds, the Grivegnée United Workers Ensemble performed, notably, Leutner’s Ouverture triomphale, the first in a long series of countless ensemble or symphony concerts performed indoors or on the bandstand. There were also theatre and music hall shows, fireworks, illusionists, hot air balloonists – the famous Captain Gilbert and his spinning hot air balloon! – singers and acrobats, dioramas and giant cinema screens, walks, games, get-togethers, balls, billiard tournaments. All these activities took place in the city centre, at the Trinkhall or in the park, the beating heart of a more mainstream than middle-class sociability which today is partly forgotten but can now be found in the more modern-day October events. It’s in the archaeology of the place, the location of the museum and, partly, the poetry of a project set in motion by the concept of “arts situés”: through the time and place of its concerts, we want to take the Trinkhall, a tiny dot on the map, to its culmination of incandescence…

the museum's partners
Ville de liège Province de Liège Culture Province de Liège Culture WBI AVIQ Loterie La première Université de Liège Fnrs la liberté de chercher